Why Is Team Romney So Tepid About Ted Nugent’s Racism?

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Since the people working over at Team Romney enjoy scoring cheap political points via invented controversies, I hope Ted Nugent’s(pictured) recent comments about President Barack Obama offer them a much-needed reminder as to how quickly the tide can turn.

SEE ALSO: Poll: Romney Catching Obama

Speaking at the NRA’s national convention in St. Louis, the musician and perpetual nonsensical accusation-hurler called President Obama a criminal and denounced his “vile, evil America-hating administration,” which is “wiping its ass with the Constitution.” Worse, he declared that “if Barack Obama becomes the president in November, again, I will either be dead or in jail by this time next year.” He then proceeded to warn the audience that, “If you can’t galvanize and promote and recruit people to vote for Mitt Romney, we’re done.”

SEE MORE: Poll: Romney Catching Obama

In theory, only CVS patrons are subjected to this kind of stupidity – and that’s because they have no choice because a crazy man is hurling his unfounded worldviews at them via megaphone in the parking lot. Unfortunately, as the obviously overextended election cycle has taught us, we’re doomed to consistently be burdened with the musings of the nonsensical until the presidential candidates shift the conversation until something substantive – say, around August, when they have no choice.

And for the record, sometimes the campaigns are just as guilty as lending credence to the fanatical, thus making them culpable. Enter, Mitt Romney’s son, Tagg Romney, who last month tweeted, “Ted Nugent endorsed my Dad today. Ted Nugent? How cool is that?! He joins Kid Rock as great Detroit musicians on team Mitt!”

In response, Democratic National Committee Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz released the following statement:

“Mitt Romney surrogate Ted Nugent made offensive comments about President Obama and November’s elections this weekend that are despicable, deplorable, and completely beyond the pale. Yet what have we heard from Mitt Romney and the Republican Party, who should be outraged that someone representing them is using language like this to make a political point? Absolutely nothing.”

Wasserman Schultz referring to Nugent as a surrogate is obviously tactical, but arguably not that great a reach for her to make.

Unlike the Hilary Rosen controversy over comments she made about Ann Romney where President Obama’s campaign had no real direct connection to the CNN paid contributor, Nugent is someone whose views are clearly fancied by Mitt Romney’s campaign. To see Mitt’s son take pride in Nugent’s point-of-view only emboldens him to offer it more. To that end, if they’re going to feign rage over Rosen’s legitimate point that a women of immense privilege – free from work, full of wealth, and ample amounts of paid help – probably isn’t the best person to consult about working women’s economic issues, certainly they can see why Nugent’s conspiracy ought to be condemned.

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